Our Licence, and what you should be aware of.

before we start, A plug for a local event……

Diss Carnival takes place on Sunday 9th June and attracts around 7,000 people every year. Last year, we introduced a Fun Dog Show for the first time and it was a real hit so we’ve brought it back for a 2nd year running! We would be so grateful if you could help us to spread the word by encouraging your customers to bring their doggies along to this. We’ve attached a poster and have also shared it via social media pages so please feel free to pop onto Diss Carnival’s facebook page and share too!

Thank you for your support 

The Diss Carnival Committee

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first off, have a look at this…….

very proud of this, so just wanted to get it in first. What it actually means is covered below.

In the last couple of years there have been a raft of changes to the laws covering both the breeding and selling of puppies. these changes have been designed to improve animal welfare, and to better protect dogs and puppies – but also buyers.

You may well be unaware of these changes, they are unlikely to have been of interest until you started to look for a pup, but you should pay a bit of attention now – it is in your best interest to do so.

the new licence (above) is now “graded”, and this is reflected in a “star rating”, with many different factors now taken into account. We had 38 pages of guidance, and I won’t bother you with all of them, but it is certaily true to say that the new rules are far more stringent than the old.

5 stars is as good as it gets (sorry, but I couldn’t resist that!)

This is important, and not everyone seems to be aware 

Will my new puppy be microchipped before I take them home?

Puppies must be microchipped before they go to their new homes under the new law that came into effect on 6 April 2016. 

The breeder should be the first registered keeper of the puppy – they are breaking the law if they do not register the puppy by the time he or she is eight weeks old. Breeders should also pass on correct microchip paperwork to the new owner when the puppy goes home.

If you are buying a small or toy breed, such as a Chihuahua, a vet may decide it’s better to wait to get the puppy chipped when they are older and bigger. If this is the case, the breeder must give you a certificate signed by a vet to prove this instead of the certificate of registration. However, there is really no reason for small breeds not to be chipped; kittens are frequently chipped from as young as eight weeks, and they are much smaller than small breed dogs.

If a breeder has not microchipped and registered the puppy before you take them home, and cannot give you evidence to show the reason for the delay, walk away.

Whenever you buy or rescue a puppy or adult dog, you should ask your vet to scan them on your first visit to make sure that the chip corresponds with the paperwork you’ve been given.  Errors can and do happen easily, so always make sure the chip and paperwork match.

that is general information, and not just if you come to us for a puppy. There are still people advertising unchipped pups, or offering to chip at your expense, and register the pup straight to you.

Owners who do not get their dog microchipped and registered with an approved database face a fine of up to £500 if caught.

It is the law, and the reason for not chipping is probably to avoid traceability (and tax). It may not bother you now, but if anything should be wrong with the pup…….

This is pobably not where you thought looking for a puppy would lead you, what with the talk of “law” and “databases”, but you just have to take it on trust that these things are put in place to protect both you and the puppies – and that has to be good, right?

Now you have seen this, and maybe know more than you did before, please continue on to have a look at our puppies.

I will leave you with this (again!)